Category Archives: Satellites

ISS APRS Passes 11-2-11 to 11-6-11

It has been a crazy past week as well as weekend, actually didn’t have a weekend as I worked all day both Saturday and Sunday and before I knew it, it was Monday again. So needless to say there was little time left for playing APRS via the ISS (or even seeing if I can still catch/receive any signal from ARISSAT-1). The few ISS passes that I was able to break away and set up to work were silent passes. Guess I need to check the ISS Fan Club site a little more often to know if there is any activity prior to the upcoming pass. Any way here are the next good passes for the next 5 days that I hope to try and work.

Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/2 20:00:20
Azimuth: 309.31° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.17°
Magnitude: 1.3
Distance to satellite: 2269.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/2 20:05:35
Azimuth: 209.59° (SSW)
Elevation (altitude): 78.72°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 405.6 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/2 20:10:40
Azimuth: 134.59° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.62°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2218.1 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Good visible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/3 12:35:0
Azimuth: 231.63° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.13°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2212.6 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/3 12:40:5
Azimuth: 325.05° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 75.04°
Magnitude: -2.5
Distance to satellite: 392.4 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/3 12:45:5
Azimuth: 48.19° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.58°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2180.2 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/6 10:19:40
Azimuth: 229.33° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.29°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2193.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/6 10:24:40
Azimuth: 305.64° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 84.57°
Magnitude: -2.6
Distance to satellite: 380.2 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/6 10:29:45
Azimuth: 49.14° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.35°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2198.1 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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There is an 88 degree pass shown on 11/5/11 starting at 18:45 but unable to pull it up and copy the pass details on the n2yo site.

Below are several good ARISSAT-1 passes that I will also see if I can get a good copy on one of the passes. There was one last night but had just gotten to work and was not able to catch it.

Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/2 12:28:0
Azimuth: 220.91° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.04°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2140.9 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/2 12:32:50
Azimuth: 140.16° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 59.61°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 403.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/2 12:37:40
Azimuth: 52.78° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.38°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2103.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/3 19:19:0
Azimuth: 310.70° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.02°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2159.1 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/3 19:23:55
Azimuth: 23.73° (NNE)
Elevation (altitude): 86.33°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 353.4 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/3 19:28:45
Azimuth: 131.08° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.37°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2096.9 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Good visible pass

———————————-

Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/4 11:44:50
Azimuth: 223.56° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.25°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2114.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/4 11:49:40
Azimuth: 133.40° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 69.88°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 371.4 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/4 11:54:25
Azimuth: 51.60° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.53°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2082.7 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 11/6 10:00:40
Azimuth: 225.75° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.22°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2114.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 11/6 10:05:30
Azimuth: 132.96° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 79.18°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 354.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 11/6 10:10:15
Azimuth: 50.63° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.55°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2076.5 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Must be something with the data for November 5th on the site as there is a 83 degree pass that starts at 18:35 also listed but no details are shown on the site for the pass either.
Got two passes today, one for ARISSAT-1 and one for the ISS so hoping I can catch one of them.

Until next time….73s!

ISS APRS Passes 10-24-11 to 10-28-11

Looks like there will not be any very good high passes this week, the best one is going to be a 65 degree pass on 10/27. So with that said here are this weeks passes that I will be trying to work.

Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/24 23:46:25
Azimuth: 306.43° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.03°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2292.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/24 23:51:40
Azimuth: 221.90° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 53.82°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 487.0 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/24 23:56:45
Azimuth: 141.69° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.48°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2229.2 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/25 16:20:40
Azimuth: 238.33° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.29°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2203.5 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/25 16:25:40
Azimuth: 320.66° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 52.72°
Magnitude: -2.1
Distance to satellite: 474.6 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/25 16:30:45
Azimuth: 45.77° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.41°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2210.7 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/25 22:48:40
Azimuth: 313.43° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.29°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2260.1 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/25 22:53:50
Azimuth: 37.60° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 59.24°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 458.8 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/25 22:59:0
Azimuth: 123.75° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.40°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2238.2 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/26 15:22:50
Azimuth: 220.22° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.25°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2201.0 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/26 15:27:50
Azimuth: 137.41° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 58.90°
Magnitude: -2.3
Distance to satellite: 440.7 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/26 15:32:50
Azimuth: 52.97° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.62°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2180.4 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/27 22:28:55
Azimuth: 307.83° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.27°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2258.4 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/27 22:34:5
Azimuth: 223.14° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 65.10°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 435.0 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/27 22:39:10
Azimuth: 138.21° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.63°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2208.5 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/28 15:02:55
Azimuth: 234.83° (SW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.05°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2223.3 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/28 15:08:0
Azimuth: 321.31° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 63.12°
Magnitude: -2.4
Distance to satellite: 424.2 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/28 15:13:5
Azimuth: 47.03° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.32°
Magnitude: 1.2
Distance to satellite: 2211.1 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): NO

Invisible pass

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Pass beginning
Date/time: 10/28 21:30:55
Azimuth: 314.57° (NW)
Elevation (altitude): 0.11°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2270.7 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Maximum altitude
Date/time: 10/28 21:36:5
Azimuth: 36.65° (NE)
Elevation (altitude): 49.59°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 509.1 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Pass ending
Date/time: 10/28 21:41:10
Azimuth: 120.22° (SE)
Elevation (altitude): 0.58°
Magnitude: –
Distance to satellite: 2213.4 km
In Earth’s shadow (eclipsed): YES

Invisible pass

Hopefully I will be able to work several of these passes this coming week. I am seeing that I am needing to invest (again) in batteries for my D7 HT so have not been able to try to operate via HT only on some of these ISS Passes when I have been out and about due to work demands. I know that last time I needed to get batteries for my D& HT I had to do a lot of searching to find a company that still made batteries. So I may go with a battery holder this time around.

Until next time…..73s!

Worked ISS from (repaired) D700

Well, finally took my dead D700 into the Kenwood Repair Depot (which I am fortunate is local here in Va. Beach) to get repaired. I held off fearing it was a cracked board (or worse) since the unit had been dropped. So I did the usual visual inspections for hair line cracks or fractured solder joints but none were found or at least visually evident. The was the extent of my troubleshooting, I intended to do more but the current work load between both the full time and part time jobs made that a bit challenging. But fortunately it was only a defective 9.6 volt regulator that was damaged and only cost $88 to repair. Yes, I say only as I was expecting much worse. So now I am back online via my D700. Didn’t realize how long that I had been without it as it took me a little while to remember how to reprogram it and get it all set back up for APRS.

I was planning on working the ISS pass last night but ended up working later than originally planned and missed that one but there was another very good (high) pass this afternoon and worked the ISS using the D700. Worked very well and got two messages from other operators. (AB1OD & W8KRF). Just was not able to type back a reply message fast enough via the microphone keypad. I have worked the ISS via my HT and a laptop running APRS+SA before and it was much easier to type replies/messages. Now that I have my D700 back I am brainstorming on some ideas. (more on this later) I still need to come up with a good way to keep a log of stations I receive messages from as well as successfully sent messages to other operators. I am wanting something (a log) that I can update while mobile as well as a way of verifying that my messages was actually received and digi’ed by the ISS. Hopefully on the next good pass I will attempt to send messages back to the above operators, thus why I am wanting some sort of log of rx’ed and ACK’ed messages.
That is all I have for now, so until next time….73s!

YouTube Video of KG6ZFI receiving ARISSat-1

As mentioned in a previous post there was a YouTube video that I saw of KG6ZFI listening to ARISSat-1 passing over his QTH and decoding the SSTV signal. Here is the link to that video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzqrX1y0OJk

When I saw the simple setup that he had for receiving SSTV and the program he was using, (and now know that what I was “hearing” is SSTV) I decided to give it a try and see if I could get a couple of images from ARISSat-1. I played around with the software some late last night with the test SSTV audio clips that you can download from the same site and see that I need to figure out/learn how to get the synchronization correct because all the test images I tried I either got all slanted images or if I was able to tweak it enough to see the image it was not very clear, a lot of “ghosting” in the image. But in spite of this I still made an attempt on this mornings pass. My setup did attempt to work as I was able to get one slanted image. By the time the next SSTV interval came around the signal was fading too much to get anything. Also the laptop that I chose to use I found, won’t allow me to listening to the microphone audio through the speaker. So need to make some changes here as well. I have never messed with SSTV until now, though a friend of mine, N1LMR has expressed interest in SSTV awhile back so may need to see if he still has this “itch”. So I will keep playing around with this until I drill down and learn how to get the images/soundcard in sync for good reception.

This is the program that was used by KG6ZFI that I am trying to use:


http://mmhamsoft.amateur-radio.ca/

Well, that is all for now…so until next time…73s!

Heard ARISSat-1 during ISS Pass

Well, the last two ISS passes at 12:56 AM EST and again at 7:24 AM EST were both silent passes on APRS. But just for grins and giggles since I have been seeing so much activity on the AMSAT-BB Sig group about ARISSat (and I did attempt to watch the deployment online between demands of work) I dialed up the 145.950 freq on the HT as well. During the 12:56 AM pass all was quiet, but during the 7:24 AM pass while waiting and listening for APRS from the ISS I heard the recorded voice messages from ARISSat-1. The signal was fading in and out but was good copy most of the pass. Also heard some telemetry data which I was not sure what it was before the recording cycled again. So looking at the tracking on http://www.n2yo.com I see the ARISSat-1 and the ISS are running pretty much the same track/path, only that ARISSat is running a few minutes ahead of the ISS. So got two very good near overhead passes on Sunday, one in the morning and again late that night, so I have them both set as alerts and will see if I can pick it up again during these next two passes. And do a little more reading to see what the telemetry I heard and if this is the data being fed to the website showing the ARISSat health/status.

Until next time….73s!